echo midi mia soundcard

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echo midi mia soundcard

Postby adrian » Wed Apr 07, 2004 1:22 pm

hi

i am using sonar 3, with some good results, and have recently decided to buy a new soundcard - the echo mia midi. i am in the process of rigging this up to my mixing desk (folio notepad) and was wondering if there are any basic suggestions about types of lead and how i should best set up the system.

i was thinking of taking the "master mix out" from the mixing desk and running that "in" to the soundcard via balanced 1/4 inch jacks, and running the output from the soundcard into the mixing desk via the "tape" in - but this is a phono socket. not sure what leads i should use. the soundcard also has a breakout lead with S/PDIF (?) sockets. not entirely sure how to use this......

if anyone out there knows these two bits of hardware, and can help me, i would be very grateful.

thanks
adrian
adrian
 

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Postby andychap » Wed Apr 07, 2004 2:01 pm

Try to use balanced leads wherever possiple in a computer based studio. There will be a lot of interference from your CRT monitor and there are loads of mains leads etc.

The way you are thinking of conneting is fine but if you want to include your output from the soundcard in a mix ie. looping it back with something added or an outboard effect, then you will need to go through one of you stereo inputs. With the tape in you won't have control over volume panning etc like on the normal inputs.

Use a balanced lead all the way to the tape in and then use a 1/4 inch TRS to phono adaptor or make a small cable about 6 inches long with a female 1/4 inch TRS (like on a headphone extension) on one end and a single end RCA on the other end. This keeps the lenght of lead that can be exposed to interence down to a minimum.

If the S/PDIF sockets look like RCA sockets then you need 75 Ohm coax cable with RCA (gold plated if possible) plugs at either end, these are commonly used as video cables. You obviously have to have something with the same connectors to connect to. I have mine connected to my amp and use the digital out put for mixing and mastering with crystal clear clarity and neutral reponse.

Hope that helps :D
andychap
 
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thanks

Postby adrian » Wed Apr 07, 2004 5:18 pm

thanks andychap,

excellent advice, as always!

i am in the process of buying myself some nice balanced leads. presumbaly, i should think about getting a nice amp and mixing desk with S/PDIF connectors in order to get the best clarity?

am hoping that the balanced leads will get rid of some of the interference / noise that i got with my previous multimedia card.

adrian
adrian
 

Postby andychap » Wed Apr 07, 2004 6:31 pm

A digital mixing desk will cost a fair bit more than a normal analogue desk.

The only benefit would be if you are going to record your stuff to an external source like DAT or Mini Disc. If you are planning just to put your stuff on CD then it would be a waste of time because all the processing will be done within the PC.

I record to mini disc for reheasal and some live stuff but actually find that sometimes it sounds a bit sterile, it lacks that analogue warmth.

The benefit with monitoring through digital is that you can hear mistakes better and when clipping occurs it is very noticable when it's digital.

That's why I use a digital input on the amp but don't bother with a digital mixer.
andychap
 
Posts: 687
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2003 7:26 pm
Location: UK



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