conexant midi device

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conexant midi device

Postby Ghost » Mon Mar 15, 2004 9:36 pm

Cakewalk sonar accepts my conexant device for audio but not midi

anyone else have a conexant audio AC something or other device?
Ghost
 

Re: conexant midi device

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Postby HDB » Mon Mar 15, 2004 10:33 pm

What I think it may be seeing in there is a voice modem, which would explain why it sees an audio device but not MIDI. Do you have a soundcard, and what kind is it? Is it a add-on card in a slot, or is it integral to the motherboard. Look at your modem....does it have 1/8" jacks? Is the modem an add-on, or built in. (I kinda doubt the soundcard would be an add-on because I think Windows would bug you to try to load the drivers when you turn the computer on, if they are not there). I doubt this will make any difference, but did you run Wave Profiler? You need to investigate to find out what you have. If it's an built-in, maybe it's disabled in the BIOS, and you need to enable it.
Check all this out. When you figure out what you have, check to see if you have a driver disk for it. If not, you may have to download drivers. If you find a card in there, carefully remove it (following all the safety precautions), and, handling carefully, write down ANYthing that is printed on the board, or on a sticker, and maybe on the larger IC's. Google up what may appear to be the most obvious thing that may be a part number. After a bit of sleuthing, you can usually find drivers.
If it's on the MB, enabling it in BIOS may be all that you need for Windows to recognize it and find it in the Windows System directory, on the Windows install disk, or the recovery disk if one came with that computer.
If you have no sound device, other than a voice modem, you may be outta luck with MIDI until you install one.
Let us know what happens after all that.
Good luck,
HDB :shock:
HDB
 
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Postby Guest » Fri Mar 19, 2004 4:21 pm

Okay, I do have a conexant 56k AClink modem installed.
As far as sound goes, I have conexant AC link audio, legacy audio drivers and something labelled as Unimodem half-duplex audio device. That unimodem audio device is located on the modem.

My modem has your standard phone jack.

I have not run wave profiler.

I wonder what CD that came with my computer purchase would have sound or midi drivers on it. What would it be labelled as? Just system disk or something?

I am running sonar on my laptop. I just have a standard built in sound device; your standard mute button, volume control, mic in, phones out.

All sonar recognizes are microsoft midi mappers for midi output and no inputs...

Also, once I download midi or audio drivers how do I attempt to make Windows recognize the driver? I assume the driver I download has to correspond with a device? that is the device has to recognize the driver.

Should this conexant device have midi capability?

thanks for the response

HDB wrote:What I think it may be seeing in there is a voice modem, which would explain why it sees an audio device but not MIDI. Do you have a soundcard, and what kind is it? Is it a add-on card in a slot, or is it integral to the motherboard. Look at your modem....does it have 1/8" jacks? Is the modem an add-on, or built in. (I kinda doubt the soundcard would be an add-on because I think Windows would bug you to try to load the drivers when you turn the computer on, if they are not there). I doubt this will make any difference, but did you run Wave Profiler? You need to investigate to find out what you have. If it's an built-in, maybe it's disabled in the BIOS, and you need to enable it.
Check all this out. When you figure out what you have, check to see if you have a driver disk for it. If not, you may have to download drivers. If you find a card in there, carefully remove it (following all the safety precautions), and, handling carefully, write down ANYthing that is printed on the board, or on a sticker, and maybe on the larger IC's. Google up what may appear to be the most obvious thing that may be a part number. After a bit of sleuthing, you can usually find drivers.
If it's on the MB, enabling it in BIOS may be all that you need for Windows to recognize it and find it in the Windows System directory, on the Windows install disk, or the recovery disk if one came with that computer.
If you have no sound device, other than a voice modem, you may be outta luck with MIDI until you install one.
Let us know what happens after all that.
Good luck,
HDB :shock:
Guest
 

Postby andychap » Fri Mar 19, 2004 5:37 pm

I doubt whether the connexant on board sound will have any midi capabilities and the sound quality won't be that great.

I would look at getting some thing like the Creative MP3+. Just plug into a USB port, install drivers and all the other software, and you get analogue stereo in and out, optical digital in and out, mic in amd head phones out. It also has a built in software midi synth that will be better than the microsoft things.

You also get a stack of music orientated software for editing your music, organising it and ripping, converting, burning and minidisc recording.

All for 35 GB pounds. I used one for over a year and it worked well.
andychap
 
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Postby HDB » Fri Mar 19, 2004 11:25 pm

I'd have to agree with Andy about getting a USB external MIDI/Audio device, if you want any kind of decent sound. Meanwhile, you may go to Control Panel in Windows and try to to install new hardware. If it doesn't find it automatically, you could try "No, the Device isn't in the list",>Next>"No, I want to select the hardware from a list">Next>"Sound,Video,Game Controllers">Next. It will do a scan, and give you some options. If you can find in the manual that came with the computer, what kind of sound device it has built in, see if it's in the list, and try loading it. If that doesn't work, select "Have Disk", and put a CDRom that may have it in. It's impossible for me to know what CD it would be, or what you have. You may even try downloading something like SiS Sandra and running it. Maybe it can tell you what's in there. (Just Google "Sandra", and it will go right to it. It's a small utility that analyzes your system).
You may just have to shove CD's that came with your computer in there, and just start clicking on everything until you find what it's looking for. That could take a while. You'll know if you are watching carefully when it finds the .ini file it wants. Obviously, you could skip folders like "Printer"...etc. You may have to dig, and you may still not find it. I would start with a Restore disk if you have one, or a Windows disk. If you have any disks with something that says "Drivers" on it, can't hurt to try. It's not gonna load anything wrong. (Usually).
That's all I got for now.
Good luck,
HDB :shock:
HDB
 
Posts: 46
Joined: Sat Feb 07, 2004 12:19 am

Creative MP3+.

Postby Ghost » Sat Mar 20, 2004 9:05 pm

Sounds great.

Thanks for the insight.

cheers
Ghost
 

Solution is free

Postby rickymontero » Mon Dec 10, 2007 9:26 pm

Hi. I got a tip for you

Visit http://www.asio4all.com/ and download this driver, I got Presario V6000 and it works fine, I did not test with the midi input yet cause i have non, however the Midi output is working fine, at least for metronome, midi editing, and stuff....

I,m using the same conexant driver and sound card it has 24 bits and 96khz sampling rate, I dont now about the preamps yet, but if you have a desktop, try to use the line in Input, on board preamps are not the best option.

Let me know if it works, this way you can avoid to get an external midi device, I was worried about my laptop man.....!!!!! Midi modules here are not cheap

Grettings from Peru
rickymontero
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2007 9:16 pm
Location: Lima Peru



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